ANNOUNCEMENT…

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I am up against it with a new deadline, so I am taking a break from blogging for a while.  (The knee surgery this winter took more out of me than I anticipated–I got very little done then.)  I WILL be back, though!!!  Meanwhile I would love to hear from anyone who cares to discuss a book or respond to any of my observations and rants.

Amazon sales!

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An update on titles available on Amazon:

Kindle version for the screaming deal of 99¢ —

AND

 

Additionally, it would seem that the publisher has made quite a number of older titles available in the Kindle format.  They are available here:

Wilma Count’s Amazon Page

 

MORE READING

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If you are a fan of Regency/Victorian era fiction, I highly recommend Belgravia by Julian Fellowes, the writer-producer behind Downton Abbey.  The story of Belgravia is rather predictable, but the book gives a nice slice of life in the early years of Victoria’s reign.  My only quibble with this work was the author’s inadvertent shifts in point of view.  I personally like it when a writer allows me to see a given scene from within the perception of one character—one character at a time, that is.  I do not like being jerked from one consciousness to another, from one paragraph to the next yet!  I’d be interested in hearing how others feel about this business of point of view.

Ever since I read Helene Hanff’s 84 Charing Cross Road in the ‘70s, I have loved books about books and their readers.  You may recall that 84. . . is about a New York woman who exchanges a series of letters—and goody boxes—with employees in a book shop in London.  The exchanges took place while the English were still suffering the post war privations of WWII.  Hanff’s characterizations, as well as her insights into books, are nothing short of delightful.

Recently I discovered The Little Paris Book Shop by Nina George.  Monsieur Perdu’s book shop is located in Paris on a barge on the Seine.  For years Perdu has cut himself off from life, but has acted as a “literary apothecary” for others, recommending just the right books to mend broken souls.  Then comes the day when he sets his barge loose and, with an assortment of fellow travelers, journeys on French rivers and canals, still prescribing books along the way.  And, of course, he eventually achieves his own degree of wellness.

Finally, I loved The Readers of Broken Wheel Recommend by Katarina Bovald.  Sara, a Swedish woman, travels to Broken Wheel, Iowa, at the invitation of her American pen pal with whom she has shared a love of books.  She arrives in Broken Wheel just as the townspeople are attending her friend’s funeral.  Broken Wheel is aptly named, for the town is dying, and one would think it a most unlikely location in which to open a bookshop.  But Sara does exactly that.  Broken Wheel’s recommendations offer treats in both books and characters.  Another good read!

TAXES and SERVING THE PUBLIC

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The Trumpsters are ever so elated about DT’s leaked (self-leaked?) 2005 taxes.  He actually paid about 25% on declared income!  I find it interesting that this so-called billionaire’s rate is significantly lower than that of most folks in the middle class.  I know a retired school teacher whose rate is higher.  Ya gotta hand it to those who know how to work the system.  And we do!  Hand it to them, that is.

Most public servants pay lip service to serving the public.  And yes, 45 talks about service and what great things he wants for America, but his real interest—and that of his adult family members—appears to be in using the U.S. Treasury as his own personal piggy bank as he golfs his way through every weekend at his own venues—where we taxpayers are picking up the tab for his entourage (secret service, et. al.) to stay at his hostelries.  Wonder if the prices are jacked up on weekends?

Public service indeed!—as he proceeds to put in power people bent on destroying agencies that serve public interests.  Witness what he is doing or trying to do in term of national parks and federal land, or the environment, or public education, to name only the most obvious.  I have little doubt there is ample room for improvement in the way government serves public interests in these matters, but I also doubt that repeatedly “throwing the baby out with the bath water” is quite the way to do it.

SUGGESTED READING

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The March edition of The Atlantic magazine has a must read article for those of us who are less than ecstatic about the current regime in Washington.

In “How to Build an Autocracy” David Frum discusses the destruction of traditional safeguards in a government that has served us well for over two hundred years.  He first targets a legislature that abrogates its oversight responsibilities to the point that it becomes subservient to the executive branch.  And this was written before we saw the chairman of a House investigative committee go running to the President to report on evidence brought before his committee!

Frum also points out that Presidents have tremendous powers of appointment, removal, and pardon.  Ordinarily the President’s own ethics and desire to “promote the common welfare” serve as a check on those powers. But, Frum asks point-blank: “What happens if somebody comes to high office lacking those qualities?”  One might add: what if that someone is a person who just sneers at restraints?  “I am the President and you are not.”

The Atlantic author also cites subtle and not-so-subtle encouragement of civil unrest to inflame emotional rather than rational reactions to issues and problems.  We saw this at work repeatedly in DT’s campaign strategy—thus “ratifying [his] apocalyptic vision” and providing excuses for repression of protests.  Paradoxically, we also have a large segment of the electorate that simply doesn’t care.  DT and his ilk count on public indifference.  Remember when he famously said he could get away with murder in broad daylight and no one would object?  Well?  Where are the protests about the Russian involvement?  About the dismantling of public education?  About the rape of the environment?  About the gross expenditures for his golfing trips?  About . . .

Frum does not dwell on DT’s relationship but with the press, but I would argue that DT’s attempts to weaken “the Fourth Estate” is yet another technique in undermining American democracy.  The media, per se, is not the enemy, but it is incumbent on citizens that we remain informed—to seek balance in our sources—to at least TRY to sort out what the truth may be in given issues.  Otherwise, we leave ourselves ripe for autocracy.

SEPARATION. NO, NOT “SEPARATE BUT EQUAL”—SEPARATE AND BALANCED

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In some instances, I suppose, the word separation could be viewed as negative.  However, when it comes to the Constitution of the United States, it most definitely is NOT.  The Constitution, along with its amendments, lays out very clearly two specific areas of separation in our democracy.

The separation of church and state—of religion and government—is laid out in the First Amendment and has been reinforced repeatedly by court decisions.  The principle is directed at religion—not A religion.  Tempting as it is for “true believers” of any sect to try to impose their views on the rest us—that just is not the American way.  Whether it is Sharia law or the Beatitudes, the Torah or the Koran—political policy is not to be shaped by religious doctrine.  This is a basic principle that certain evangelicals need to relearn—Mike Pence comes immediately to mind.  Bottom line: Keep your religion out of the government we share.

Another “separation” principle that is currently being trampled upon is the Separation of Powers.  The Constitution draws distinct lines in terms of the powers of the legislative, executive, and judicial powers of government.  These distinctions give us the “checks and balances” which have, heretofore, served us so well.  But when one branch overreaches in defining its own powers—as in Nixon’s “imperial Presidency”—the balance is severely disrupted.  Likewise, when one branch refuses to do its job—as the Republican-controlled Congress has done for years—chaos threatens.  Occasionally, even the judiciary—that bastion of objectivity and fairness—is open to accusations of “legislating from the bench.”  Maybe that’s why the Court reverses itself every twenty years or so.

Usually a “rogue branch” that overreaches itself is quickly brought back into line by one or both of the others.  Separation of Powers.  Checks and Balances.  These are good things—no?  It remains to be seen how that works when one party is more or less in control of all three branches.

HUMILITY—THE MISSING INGREDIENT

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Have you noticed that DT and his ilk regularly talk down to us—as though fellow American citizens are merely ignorant children who must have things explained “properly.”  Is this arrogance—or what?  I may not “know more than the generals do” as the current occupant of the oval office claims to do, but—by God!—I am a reasonably well-read American citizen and I am as capable of understanding and coming to logical conclusions on matters as the orange man is.

So, just tell me the truth and let me decide.  That is the collective “me”—the one Walt Whitman wrote of all the time—and I want the real truth, not an alternative version.  If there is more than one way of viewing a given matter, tell me.  I’m a grown up.  I can figure it out.  Again: the collective “I” there.  Just don’t hide information from the folks you are supposed to be serving.

Truth.  A rare commodity in government circles these days.  More’s the pity.

Nor is it just ordinary citizens that DT and his treat as far less perceptive than they.  Did you see that so-called news conference?  (Has there been more than one yet?)  I was surprised those reporters did not just gather their notebooks and walk out.  What the world needs now—well, what the White House Press Room needs—is another Helen Thomas.  At least Morning Joe’s Mika Brezinski got it right in calling out Kellyanne—mouthpiece extraordinaire—for her lack of credibility.  Good on ya, Mika!

So now—in another stroke of sheer arrogance—certain journalists are to be denied access to White House briefings.  DT seeks to control the very information we receive in order to ensure that nothing negative leaks out.  It is a blatant attempt to control the media, which as any historian will inform you, is the action of the worst of history’s dictators.

“Doing the job” may be more difficult for those “banned” journalists, but I have confidence that they will, indeed, keep at it and try to ensure that we have solid information on which to form our conclusions.

Now—if we could just get all those so-called “leaders” in government to heed those town hall chants and DO THEIR JOBS.